Business Laws For Small Businesses

Talking about business laws in microscopic detail would need a couple of months of your time! There is indeed a plethora of legislation that governs small businesses, ranging from state to county laws. Some are relevant to your business even today whereas others are outdated and have not been enforced since the early part of the last century!

It is not possible for any single entity, including your local law enforcement department to know them all. Yet, it is vital that you are familiar with at least the most important laws that pertain to your business. As usual we’re here to help.

Business laws fall into certain categories as listed below:

o Business formation laws – these laws pertain to the structure of the business. For example a sole proprietorship is regulated very differently from a corporation.

o Tax laws comprise laws pertaining to all taxation issues, whether it is the filing of returns or the payment of sales tax, corporate tax and other similar levies.

o Employment laws – these govern recruitment and retrenchment of employees, wages & workers’ compensation, unemployment benefits, workers’ rights and related issues.

o Trademark and patent laws – these laws pertaining to ownership of intellectual property such as inventions, trademarks and patents.

o Environmental laws – Companies engaged in the recycling of material and the discharge of hazardous waste must comply with environmental regulations.

o Consumer protection laws – these protect the consumer from fraud or unfair business or advertising practices.

Headache, already? Here are a few tips to help you deal with it.

One size doesn’t fit all. We just talked about some of the important legal categories under which you will find regulations that affect most businesses. In addition, specific laws may apply depending on the type of activity involved. If, for example, you are selling company stocks you will need to adhere to the Securities Law, but for a medical practice, there’s an entirely different set of rules that come into play. State laws may also dictate how contracts and legal documents are to be written and enforced.

Start at the beginning. Just as you craft a business plan in stages, look at the whole legal puzzle bit by bit. Begin with the laws pertaining to the basics of starting a business. Do you need a business license or a special permit? Are you planning to hire employees or will you go it alone? If your business sells goods, it will need to pay sales tax. Look at each business aspect carefully to understand which category of laws apply to it.

Know only what you need to. If you are in business by yourself, for example, you won’t need to bother with laws governing workers and staff until you are ready to hire additional people. Likewise, if you are in a service business, you typically won’t need to bother yourself with removal of hazardous waste.

See the bigger picture. As your business grows, so will the number of applicable laws. Always examine the legal angle when you plan new projects and initiatives. Also, discuss all potential significant legal matters with your advisor.

Ensure compliance. Be unafraid to ask questions of your legal advisor and do not assume something is legal just because it is a common trade practice. Also talk to the local Chamber of Commerce or other business owners to make sure you are on the right side of the law.

Make amends. Finally, should you find that you’ve contravened a law without intending to, take remedial measures. The law is quite lenient with first time offenders – of course, it also depends on the nature of the violation.

Having to deal with laws and legislation may seem a drag, but there’s no denying their importance. Taking adequate steps to ensure that you have to run into them only as much as you need to!

The Top Law Firms in the United States

The top law firms in the US are actually not all based in New York or Washington DC, some are in Chicago and Pittsburgh, the main industrial centres, and these firms specialize in helping businesses which have a global market. Some of these are Baker and Mackenzie in Chicago and DLA Piper also in Chicago, along with May Blain in the same city and Kana L Gates in Pittsburgh. These firms are among the law firms with the highest number of attorneys, partners and associates in the US.

Baker and Mackenzie and DLA Piper specialize in commercial and business law with offices in many countries, and Baker and Mackenzie pride themselves on employing people from 60 different nationalities, pointing out that this gives them an edge when it comes to knowing how to deal with the business laws in different countries. They assist businesses which trade in the global marketplace and can advise on the laws in different countries. They also have expertise in the culture of the countries in which they have offices -all 68 of them.

Then there are the law firms which also deal with Pro Bono cases and have a more philanthropic outlook, and the top among these are Latham and Watkins who are based in New York and Skaddon, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom also based in New York. The former also has a Diversity Scholarship Program so that more students from different social and ethnic backgrounds get a chance to become lawyers and both take on Pro bono cases. Latham and Watkins won the prestigious American Bar Association Pro Bono Publico Award in 2003, a testimony to their commitment to take non-paying clients as well as the more affluent clients. Latham and Watkins feature regularly in Top 10 lists of American law firms for various reasons, not only because they are the fifth largest employer of attorneys in the US. They have stuck to their roots which were in labor law and tax, before they began their global expansion.

A very well-known law firm, Hogan Lovell’s began in 1904 in the US with Frank J. Hogan who successfully won high-profile politically charged cases soon after he established his firm. On 1st May 2010, Hogan and Hartson merged with Lovell’s of the UK to become one of the top10 global legal services providers. This company is based in Washington DC but has offices all over the world.

History Of Business Law Degree

It has been told that Doctor Juries is the first person to be awarded a professional degree and doctorate in the Business law degree professionally.

In the United States the degree was for the first time awarded in the Harvard University.

This took place in the 19th century, which was found to be similar to the Business law degree of an old European doctor.

The scientific study of law which originally originated from the 19th century in Harvard was the only degree of law that had a goal of an elementary preparation for professional business lawyers.

It only had a three year program and it was the only program which was professional in law in that particular time, in that jurisdiction.

Let’s take like for instance in Canada and the United States of America, a professional degrees such as D.D.S, D.O, M.D. and like many others the thesis were not very much required.

Primarily the degree only existed in the USA, not until the early years in the 1997; it happened that most of the other universities around the world in other countries appear to have started using it for the very first time.

In each and every country, Business law degree has its unique way of being practiced.

With a touch on the history as we all know, every thing that has an existence or once existed in this world it must have a historical aspect of it, lets have a little of an over view of the first time of the original roots of the Business law degree.

The foundations first started its existence in the 11th century in the European universities which was referred to as glossators which were the schools of law.

Bologna was the first university in Europe which was founded as a law school and later in the 12th century became very popular with in the legal scholars.

These were the students from the Glossator School which was within the city. The Bologna University was the model university which severed as medieval during those days.

During those days, it was very common for the students who studied law to visit other countries to study.

But like in the Great Britain this was not the case because of the rejection of Roman law but with an exception for the Admiralty court which had a jurisdiction.

This was so until after the reformation of English, the Cambridge and the Oxford University did not teach the canon law.